Asian-American Rappers Are Slowly, But Surely, Gaining The Traction They Deserve

Asian-American Rappers Are Slowly, But Surely, Gaining The Traction They Deserve:

An excerpt:

Cho points to Dumbfoundead as a key example of how the Internet has
empowered Asian-American artists to find their core niche of fans.
“Dumbfoundead never had any particular hit that propelled his fame to
the ‘next level,’” he says. “Instead, he’s built a sustainable career
out of catering to a very particular audience: Asian-American kids in
middle school and college who are active on social media, and who would
find someone like him to be their role model. Even if these kids aren’t
on the radar of major advertising execs, Dumbfoundead saw the value in
reaching out to them, and is selling out shows as a result.”

“At the turn of the 21st century, the concept of being an
Asian-American excelling in entertainment was relatively foreign in the
U.S., so a lot of Asian-Americans decided to move back to their
respective countries,” says Cho, alluding to artists like MC Jin and
Korean-American rapper Jessi who found more promising careers overseas. With hip-hop in particular, Asian MCs such as Rich Chigga from Indonesia and Keith Ape
from South Korea are gaining more online traction than their
Asian-American counterparts, drawing over 140 million collective views
on YouTube and landing profiles in publications like Vice and XXL—but all thanks to a vastly different brand.

“Rappers like Keith Ape and Rich Chigga are going for that shock
value: combining legitimate skill and lyricism with a troll, almost
William-Hung feel,” explains Lyricks. “As for us Asian-American rappers,
we’re still trying to figure out the sweet spot when it comes to our
branding.”

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The Asian-American Awakening: That Moment When You Realize You’re Not White

The Asian-American Awakening: That Moment When You Realize You’re Not White:

An excerpt:

You start to realize that wearing shoes in the house wasn’t that big of a
deal and not everyone ate rice for every meal. That when some people
speak slowly to you, it’s not because they’re trying to be articulate,
but it’s because they think you don’t understand English (as if speaking
English slowly to a non-English speaking person helps). You notice that
not every grocery store carries Pocky and not every family speaks a
different language at home. You also realize that it’s not that common
to call everyone who’s older than you Uncle or Aunt. When you learned
about the Civil Rights movement again, you start to wonder what happened
to Asians during that time or when people are describing you, the first
thing out of their mouth is that you’re “oriental.” (On a side note, I
hate being described as oriental. It makes me feel like a spice or
dish).

asiamsemicolonproject: In middle school, I’d stare up at the ceiling and think about slitting my…

asiamsemicolonproject:

In middle school, I’d stare up at the ceiling and think about slitting my wrists. Downing a bottle of pills. I remember putting a fistful of Advil into my mouth – willing my mind to swallow it. Slowly putting the water into the remaining space. Eventually spitting it all into a cup for my mom to find the next morning. All child’s play. My mom would say, do you really think it will mean something if you kill yourself? Do you think that people will remember you forever? People forget. That is how they survive this thing called LIFE. And don’t you forget this: LIFE is hard, but it doesn’t mean you give up.  

Keep reading

relative

jemzwesley:

I’ll never be able to be the ideal image of what you want.

I’ll never always want to be with you.
I’ll never always choose to stay up late and lose sleep talking to you on a workday.
I’ll never be able to always drop everything I’m doing to take care of you.
I’ll never be able to always communicate to you when were in argument.
I’ll never be the selfless individual you want.

But you have to understand that things are relative:

For someone who’s introverted, the time I choose to spend with you is the more than the time I choose to spend with anyone else. 
For someone who loves sleep more than anything, the time I choose to stay up late on the phone and talk to you; you know you would be the only one in my life I would do that for, even if it’s not often.
For someone who has a hard time believing that others will reciprocate good deeds if I do it for them, the time and money I willingly take out of my day to ensure that you get better from your sickness is something that I wouldn’t do except for my loved ones.
For someone who’s thoughts are always trapped in my mind, the overwhelming amount of courage and willpower it takes for me to convey my thoughts properly to you is more than when I normally just shut people out.
For someone who’s selfish, who analyzes every situation into a time/effort/cost situation, for when I am spontaneous in going places with you I do it because I want us to grow together as individuals.

I’m never going to become sacrificial, and selfless just like the way you’ll never become cautious and introverted.There are moments where we learn to compensate, to understand, to be compassionate, but we are two opposing forces and there will always be conflict as well as love, happiness and laughter. 

For if you didn’t want any of that, couldn’t you just simply date someone that’s exactly like yourself?

Follower Friday: gokujesse

Follower Fridays is a series of profiles highlighting members of Gaysian
Third Space to showcase the diversity of gaysians in the Community.
This week’s featured member is @gokujesse.

Who are you?

I never know what to say in things like this. Currently I am 24 years old. Working full time and school full time doesn’t leave a lot of time for me, but I am very enthusiastic about hot yoga, martial arts, and photography. I did Aikidou when I was in Japan and since coming to Vegas I studied Shaolin. Also idk if is is important or not to mention, but I’m a vegetarian.


Where are you from?

I was born in Nagoya, Japan and moved out to Vegas when I was thirteen. Traveling is a big part of my life. My family traveled frequently when I was a kid. Taiwan and Mexico are hands down some of my favorite places to go. I recently just traveled to New York for the first time and was really inspired by that city. I lived In San Antonio for a bit too.  

What do you do?

I work full time in Marketing for Caesars Entertainment and study International Business and Business Management majors at UNLV. I took some time when I graduated high school and so I’m a very old junior. LOL

What are you passionate about?

I just started reading 1Q84 by Murakami. I prefer hard cover books because I’m sort of building a small library.

What is your dream job (real or fantasy)?

Something to do when traveling. I would love to be a video blogger or photographer being paid to travel the world. When I was younger I loved documentaries and geographic channel.  

If you could change the world with one idea, what would it be?

Recently i’ve been a health binge, I can’t believe that some people add chemicals or inject liquid into foods to make them look better or put a wax cover of vegetables and fruits. There are probably better things that could change the world, but this is whats currently on my mind.

III

letters-to-charles:

The first time I fell in love it felt like I was about to run the mile. 

Dude, are you okay?

He leaned over and held me steady. 

I..I..yah. 

Okay, sit down.

My breath coming short, my palms sweating, and an urge to use the restroom. 

I realized. 

What’s happening? 

The second time I fell in love, we met on Grindr. 

I opened the balcony door to let in some air and then looked back at him. His back slick with sweat as he pulled on a pair of jeans—his hands on the zipper. 

His gaze raising up and locking with mine. 

I had a good time.

Me too.

Can, we, uh…are you doing anything tomorrow? 

The third time I fell in love. 

Hey, I might be back this summer. 

Oh cool, what are you going to do?

Well, I mean if you are free, I want to see you. 

Oh.