Survey Sheds Light on Chinese LGBTI Experiences

Despite the hopeful attitude expressed by @alostfish in yesterday’s post on the viral Addicted series, China still has a long way to go in fully accepting its LGBT population.  When I was in China, I had the privilege to volunteer with the Beijing LGBT Center (one of the organizers of this survey) and can attest to many personal stories of strife and struggle due to their sexuality but also of courage and affirmation. While many individuals could not be out in their daily lives, at the Beijing LGBT Center, they were free to be their authentic selves and were optimistic of a brighter future with less discrimination and homophobia in Chinese society.

This week will focus on the LGBT experiences of API individuals outside of the U.S. Many thanks to @letters-to-charles for shining a spotlight on progress in Japan, Thailand, and China and reminding me of our global, collective struggle as API LGBT brothers and sisters.

-Jeffrey

Survey Sheds Light on Chinese LGBTI Experiences

Addicted Webseries

alostfish:

I haven’t been blogging for a while (mostly due to being busy and working on G3S), so I will try to restart again and write a bit more. 

Today, a friend told me about the Chinese web series called Addicted. I will not spoil the plot for everyone here, but I find it to be pretty addicting like Heroin (double pun intended). It’s pretty much based on the old fashioned Korean drama plot lines except its mainland Chinese and gay. 

Other than the entertainment value (and I really do recommend the series, it’s been fun watching it), it’s been kind of a surreal experience for me. I actually have never thought I could see something like this coming out of mainland China given how heavy the media is censored. Shows are actually required to remove all content that can harm “social harmony”. There are a number of rules like “mistresses can’t have a happy life” and “no dating in school” that are aimed to create the illusion of a perfect society where people who exhibit behaviors not consistent with social harmony are punished by karma despite the whole host of social issues that exist in China. Blatantly showing homosexual relationships as the main theme on mainstream media was unthinkable… until now. 

I imagine that’s why it’s a web series rather than airing on TV. However, the web series has been climbing in popularity. This is very encouraging for me. Perhaps having shows like this going mainstream will help to break the social stigma surrounding same sex relationships and create more tolerance in the mainland Chinese society for LGBT communities. 

I personally enjoyed the show – its a combination of mainland Chinese (with cultural references and modern slangs), same sex romance and catchy Kdrama plot lines that I never thought could co-exist so beautifully. It’s actually just really amazing that the actors speak in mandarin accents and slangs that I relate to the most (as opposed to Taiwanese or Cantonese accents). And of course the hot boy eye candy and the risque romance scenes don’t hurt either 😛

Addicted Webseries

alostfish:

I haven’t been blogging for a while (mostly due to being busy and working on G3S), so I will try to restart again and write a bit more. 

Today, a friend told me about the Chinese web series called Addicted. I will not spoil the plot for everyone here, but I find it to be pretty addicting like Heroin (double pun intended). It’s pretty much based on the old fashioned Korean drama plot lines except its mainland Chinese and gay. 

Other than the entertainment value (and I really do recommend the series, it’s been fun watching it), it’s been kind of a surreal experience for me. I actually have never thought I could see something like this coming out of mainland China given how heavy the media is censored. Shows are actually required to remove all content that can harm “social harmony”. There are a number of rules like “mistresses can’t have a happy life” and “no dating in school” that are aimed to create the illusion of a perfect society where people who exhibit behaviors not consistent with social harmony are punished by karma despite the whole host of social issues that exist in China. Blatantly showing homosexual relationships as the main theme on mainstream media was unthinkable… until now. 

I imagine that’s why it’s a web series rather than airing on TV. However, the web series has been climbing in popularity. This is very encouraging for me. Perhaps having shows like this going mainstream will help to break the social stigma surrounding same sex relationships and create more tolerance in the mainland Chinese society for LGBT communities. 

I personally enjoyed the show – its a combination of mainland Chinese (with cultural references and modern slangs), same sex romance and catchy Kdrama plot lines that I never thought could co-exist so beautifully. It’s actually just really amazing that the actors speak in mandarin accents and slangs that I relate to the most (as opposed to Taiwanese or Cantonese accents). And of course the hot boy eye candy and the risque romance scenes don’t hurt either 😛

“College student Wan Qing, wearing a rainbow flag,…

“College student Wan Qing, wearing a rainbow flag, announced that she is lesbian during the graduation ceremony of Sun Yat-Sen University.”

Sun Yat-Sen Univerisity in Guandong, China, is known as one of the most active of China’s universities for the LGBT activism on its campus. Sun Yat-Sen was also the first university in China to have a registered LGBT student association, Happy Together ( Rainbow Association) in 2006.

Unfortunately, the group was forced to close the year after due to public and administrative uproar. Despite this, Sun Yat-Sen Univerisity still harbors an active LGBT student life in the form of forums and courses on gender and sexuality offered by supportive university professors and through unregistered groups and student activists.

To read more about Wan Qing visit these articles links.

College student comes out at graduation ceremony

Chinese college student comes ‘out’ at graduation rites

And that’s a wrap! Thanks for tuning in this week for my student and school themed postings. Good luck on the new school year to all who may be students and hang in there till summer! Until next time!

-Letters

“College student Wan Qing, wearing a rainbow flag, announced that she is lesbian during the graduation ceremony of Sun Yat-Sen University.”

Sun Yat-Sen Univerisity in Guandong, China, is known as one of the most active of China’s universities for the LGBT activism on its campus. Sun Yat-Sen was also the first university in China to have a registered LGBT student association, Happy Together ( Rainbow Association) in 2006.

Unfortunately, the group was forced to close the year after due to public and administrative uproar. Despite this, Sun Yat-Sen Univerisity still harbors an active LGBT student life in the form of forums and courses on gender and sexuality offered by supportive university professors and through unregistered groups and student activists.

To read more about Wan Qing visit these articles links.

College student comes out at graduation ceremony

Chinese college student comes ‘out’ at graduation rites

And that’s a wrap! Thanks for tuning in this week for my student and school themed postings. Good luck on the new school year to all who may be students and hang in there till summer! Until next time!

-Letters