KQTCON: Korean Queer & Trans Conference

KQTCON: Korean Queer & Trans Conference:

KQTcon 2018, the first national LGBTQ Korean conference in the United States, will take place from April 6-8, 2018. It will be an unprecedented gathering of LGBTQ people of Korean descent, parents & family members of LGBTQ Koreans, as well as allies & friends of the LGBTQ Korean community.

We are a group of volunteers across the U.S. dedicated to organizing the first national LGBTQ conference for folks of Korean descent. KQTCon is a project hosted by Dari Project, based in New York City. The Dari Project develops resources to increase awareness and acceptance in Korean American communities of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) people of Korean descent. By documenting and sharing the life stories of LGBTQ people and their families and friends, we seek to build bridges among Korean American families, social networks, institutions and faith communities.

KQTcon will be hold at The New School in New York – registration is free, and conference organizers will provide financial support for traveling and housing on a case-by-case basis until Feb 25.

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He Took a Drug to Prevent AIDS. Then He Couldn’t Get Disability Insurance.

He Took a Drug to Prevent AIDS. Then He Couldn’t Get Disability Insurance.:

actupny:

Three years ago, Dr. Philip J. Cheng, a urology resident at Harvard’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital, nicked himself while preparing an H.I.V.-positive patient for surgery.

Following hospital protocol, he took a one-month course of Truvada, a cocktail of two anti-H.I.V. drugs, to prevent infection. Later, because he was an unattached gay man, he decided to keep taking Truvada to protect himself from getting H.I.V. through sex.

The practice — called PrEP, short for pre-exposure prophylaxis — is safe and highly effective. Several studies have shown that users who take the drug daily are at nearly zero risk of H.I.V. infection.

But when Dr. Cheng applied for disability insurance — which many young doctors do to protect a lifetime’s worth of income should they be hurt — he was told that, because he was taking Truvada, he could have only a five-year policy.

[…]

There are nearly 800 life insurers in this country, according to the American Council of Life Insurers. There are no national figures on how many of them have denied coverage to men because they take PrEP.

But insurance brokers, gay-rights advocates and staff at medical clinics said in interviews they had heard of numerous such cases. H.I.V. specialists say the denials endanger men’s lives by encouraging them to drop PrEP if they need life, disability or long-term-care insurance.

HIV stigma is based on bigotry and fear, not facts.

He Took a Drug to Prevent AIDS. Then He Couldn’t Get Disability Insurance.

He Took a Drug to Prevent AIDS. Then He Couldn’t Get Disability Insurance.:

actupny:

Three years ago, Dr. Philip J. Cheng, a urology resident at Harvard’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital, nicked himself while preparing an H.I.V.-positive patient for surgery.

Following hospital protocol, he took a one-month course of Truvada, a cocktail of two anti-H.I.V. drugs, to prevent infection. Later, because he was an unattached gay man, he decided to keep taking Truvada to protect himself from getting H.I.V. through sex.

The practice — called PrEP, short for pre-exposure prophylaxis — is safe and highly effective. Several studies have shown that users who take the drug daily are at nearly zero risk of H.I.V. infection.

But when Dr. Cheng applied for disability insurance — which many young doctors do to protect a lifetime’s worth of income should they be hurt — he was told that, because he was taking Truvada, he could have only a five-year policy.

[…]

There are nearly 800 life insurers in this country, according to the American Council of Life Insurers. There are no national figures on how many of them have denied coverage to men because they take PrEP.

But insurance brokers, gay-rights advocates and staff at medical clinics said in interviews they had heard of numerous such cases. H.I.V. specialists say the denials endanger men’s lives by encouraging them to drop PrEP if they need life, disability or long-term-care insurance.

HIV stigma is based on bigotry and fear, not facts.

Follower Friday: vigornotvictor


Follower Fridays is a series of profiles highlighting members of Gaysian
Third Space to showcase the diversity of gaysians in the Community.
This week’s featured member is @vigornotvictor.

Who are you?

Hi GS3 Readers! Thanks for reaching out to be part of this space. My name is Vigor (pronounced “vig-er,” and rhymes with Tigger from Winnie the Pooh).

I am. Asian American. Cantonese Chinese. Gay. cis-Male. Currently Able-bodied. Millennial. US Citizen. Middle-class. Agnostic.

Where are you from?

This is difficult to answer, but I usually say:

-Southern by Birth. (Born in New Orleans, Louisiana)
-Midwestern Boy at Heart. (Grew up in Columbus, Ohio)
-West Coast Vibes. (Lived in Los Angeles and Berkeley, California)
-East Coast Hustle. (Currently live in Ithaca, New York)

What do you do?

I currently work as the Assistant Director of the Cornell Asian & Asian American Center. It’s hard to define what I do, as it is different every day. I am a scholar practitioner in higher education; this means that I do research on college student, identity, and leadership development and find ways to put these theories and findings into practice on a college campus. I educate students, staff, and faculty on the many, many issues and topics within the Asian, Pacific Islander, Desi American diaspora.

…in a nutshell, I help college students find meaning in their young adult life, be their authentic and whole selves, and have a lot of free pizza at campus events.

What are you passionate about?

Asian American issues. campus space and design. healthy lifestyles (e.g. lifting, staying active, eating well). husky puppies.

What is your dream job (real or fantasy)?

The current job I have is definitely a dream job! I had mentors that held jobs like mine in college and I am so grateful to be in a role like this.

If you could change the world with one idea, what would it be?

As cliche as it sounds, love conquers all. This past year especially has been one of hate and so much negative energy. Loving each other and those around you will change the world.

Amid All the Noise in D.C., Dreamers’ Fate Hangs in the Balance

Amid All the Noise in D.C., Dreamers’ Fate Hangs in the Balance:

Congress must pass the Dream Act. So much is at stake for LGBTQ undocumented young people.

In September, Donald Trump said he would cancel the Deferred Action
for Childhood Arrivals (program unless Congress passes the Dream Act.
President Obama created DACA, which has helped thousands of LGBTQ
undocumented young people to work, study, and improve their lives in
this country without the fear of deportation. Many of them come from
Asian countries.

The Dream Act will preserve DACA and will provide LGBTQ undocumented young people
with employment opportunities, educational opportunities, and even a
path to citizenship. Asian-Americans, South Asians, Southeast Asians,
and Pacific Islanders  are the fastest growing racial group in the United States today and the largest segment of new immigrants.

Over 169,000 APIs are eligible for DACA; 267,000 undocumented immigrants are LGBT, of which a disproportionate share is API. According to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, over 16,000 people from South Korea, the Philippines, India, Pakistan, and China have benefited from DACA.

Trump’s cancellation of DACA will subject 800,000 potential
beneficiaries to again live in fear of deportation. For LGBTQ people,
the stakes are even higher unless Congress passes the Dream Act.
Thousands of LGBTQ young people could be deported. Many of them to
countries where they cannot live their full and authentic LGBTQ lives.

Many counties in Asia and the Pacific prohibit same-sex relations,
such as Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Pakistan, Malaysia, Myanmar,
Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, and Tonga. In Indonesia, police shaved the heads of trans women and publicly caned a gay couple
for having consensual sex. In most Asian and Oceania countries,
transgender people cannot legally change their gender markers on their
IDs, and LGBTQ people are not protected by anti-discrimination laws.

Amid All the Noise in D.C., Dreamers’ Fate Hangs in the Balance

Amid All the Noise in D.C., Dreamers’ Fate Hangs in the Balance:

Congress must pass the Dream Act. So much is at stake for LGBTQ undocumented young people.

In September, Donald Trump said he would cancel the Deferred Action
for Childhood Arrivals (program unless Congress passes the Dream Act.
President Obama created DACA, which has helped thousands of LGBTQ
undocumented young people to work, study, and improve their lives in
this country without the fear of deportation. Many of them come from
Asian countries.

The Dream Act will preserve DACA and will provide LGBTQ undocumented young people
with employment opportunities, educational opportunities, and even a
path to citizenship. Asian-Americans, South Asians, Southeast Asians,
and Pacific Islanders  are the fastest growing racial group in the United States today and the largest segment of new immigrants.

Over 169,000 APIs are eligible for DACA; 267,000 undocumented immigrants are LGBT, of which a disproportionate share is API. According to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, over 16,000 people from South Korea, the Philippines, India, Pakistan, and China have benefited from DACA.

Trump’s cancellation of DACA will subject 800,000 potential
beneficiaries to again live in fear of deportation. For LGBTQ people,
the stakes are even higher unless Congress passes the Dream Act.
Thousands of LGBTQ young people could be deported. Many of them to
countries where they cannot live their full and authentic LGBTQ lives.

Many counties in Asia and the Pacific prohibit same-sex relations,
such as Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Pakistan, Malaysia, Myanmar,
Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, and Tonga. In Indonesia, police shaved the heads of trans women and publicly caned a gay couple
for having consensual sex. In most Asian and Oceania countries,
transgender people cannot legally change their gender markers on their
IDs, and LGBTQ people are not protected by anti-discrimination laws.